Consumption of Energy Drinks Among College Students in Quebec – Energy Drinks in the News (SPIN ALERT)

Turns out not a lot of college students in Quebec drink energy drinks, but watch out for how the news will spin concern about those who do.

Here’s the journal article (via capture because there’s no link to read the full thing):

source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28252368
Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28252368

 

This study involves over TEN THOUSAND college students across THIRTY-SIX different public colleges in Quebec.

Out of the 10,283 people who participated in the survey, only ~9.1% reported consuming an energy drink at least once a week in the previous month.

This means 9,348 out of 10,283 college students surveyed do not have an energy drink every week (like, zero energy drinks at all? For the whole week? In college?)

inconceivable

SPIN – ALERT

Because this is college, the study also looked at alcohol consumption and use of cannabis, glues/solvents, and amphetamines.

FACT – Mixing energy drinks and alcohol is a baaaaaaaaadddd idea. This study properly suggests that combination of alcohol and energy drinks poses a risk for serious adverse effects. 

FALSE – Any statements like “college students who use energy drinks are more likely to abuse psychoactive substances…more likely to demonstrate excessive use of alcohol”

Approximately 1-in-4 people (247 out of 935, ~26%) who said they drink at least one energy drink said they also use psychoactive substances. This finding is not proof that energy drinks were a gateway to psychoactive substances for these people. How many people use psychoactive substances but not energy drinks?

There were even fewer people who reported consuming alcohol-energy drink combos (109 out of 935 people. 1.1%).

That means I have at least 109 more people to convince that this combo is a waste of booze (because you won’t feel it/can’t enjoy it) and a dangerous idea (because you won’t feel drunk, but you ARE in fact impaired).

hulk-ironman-caffeine-alcohol

 

The journal article conclusion reads

“A majority of respondents are not heavy users of ED (energy drinks), AED (alcohol+energy drinks), or ED with drugs.”

Can we just stop there and celebrate that for a minute before we give fodder to the “Energy Drinks are Poison” camp?

“Yet, the profiles of ED consumption potentially harmful to health that characterize some participants indicate that the potential health consequences of such behaviour are of concern.”

I am worried this last line will get translated as, “some participants who consume energy drinks exhibit behavior that is potentially harmful to health, so we should probably be worried about all energy drink consumers.”

 

WATCH OUT FOR SPINS!!!

 

Let’s connect!

 

 

Monday Punday meets Caffeine Safety Limits – Book Excerpt of the Week

Pretend you’re on a on vacation and you’re given $400 a day, every day, to cover your expenses. Would you spend that all at once or try to make it last the whole day? Now pretend that money allowance is actually your caffeine allowance, which brings us to our excerpt of the week:

The Background

Consuming up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day is considered safe for the healthy adult population. This limit was determined by the Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate of Health Canada. The FDA uses this limit because it’s based on a comprehensive review of published studies on the effects of caffeine on human health. 

Essentially the authors of this review searched all published studies on human health and caffeine, then determined the overall consensus among the studies. 

The consensus was consuming 400 milligrams of caffeine per day doesn’t pose a threat to the heart, the bones, or male fertility, and doesn’t cause general toxicity or increased incidents of cancer. Consuming caffeine safely means not exceeding this 400 milligrams per day limit.
The Lesson

Before consuming an energy drink, look at the number of milligrams of caffeine per serving and the number of servings per container. Careful not to blow your whole caffeine allowance in one shot. 

Learn more about the ABCs of Caffeine Safety in “Are You a Monster or a Rock Star-A Guide to Energy Drinks: How They Work, Why They Work, How to Use Them Safely”.

http://amzn.to/2bjHRbk

What do energy drinks, aspirin, and multivitamins have in common? Book Excerpt of the Week

You wouldn’t eat 5 multivitamins or take 10 aspirin a day because that could make you sick. How frequently you consume an energy drink is just as important to your safety. There are many energy drinks* that are not bad for your health nor dangerous if consumed in moderation.

[*And then there are caffeinated supplements, including powder pre-workout supplements and liquid drinks like REDLINE that have so much caffeine  per serving they are dangerous/too caffeinated even when consumed as directed]

This Book Excerpt of the Week comes from PART ONE: ABCs of Caffeine Safety, C= Consumption Specifics.

For more information, check out “Are You a Monster or a Rock Star-A Guide to Energy Drinks: HowThey Work, Why They Work, How to Use Them Safely”, available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.

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What if you consume an energy drink while dehydrated? Book Excerpt of the Week

What happens if you consume an energy drink while dehydrated/without water? This Book Excerpt of the Week comes from PART ONE: ABCs of Caffeine Safety – C=Consumption Specifics. Whether an energy drink is safe for you, specifically, depends on who you are. It also depends on how (under what circumstances) you consume the product.

“Minimal dehydration (1-2% of body weight in fluids) can slow down metabolism and make you feel thirsty and slightly fatigued

caffeine-without-water

One of the reasons I developed the 5 Levels of Fatigue is because some people consume caffeine when their dehydration makes them tired. This is “Fatigue Level 1”. I urge everyone to consume a cup of water before reaching for caffeine, just in case. Sometimes, water (or the short walk to get the water and the subsequent trip to the bathroom) is enough to wake you up. This trick doesn’t work all the time, but it helps cut down on total caffeine consumption. If you want to avoid caffeine toxicity, tolerance, or dependence, you need to be strategic about when and how you consume it.

Help me share my story–  An energy drink is like your favorite song: what works for YOU might not work for me, and what works for you on a Monday morning may not be your go-to for a Friday night. As the GreenEyedGuide, I use food science to teach people how to calculate what they need and when, whether it’s water, a nap, or some healthy beverage in between.

For more information on the 5 Levels of Fatigue:

Get your copy of my book “Are You a Monster or a Rock Star-A Guide to Energy Drinks: How They Work, Why They Work, How to Use Them Safely” http://amzn.to/2bjHRbk