PBR Hard Coffee – Ingredients, Safety, Where to Find It

Pabst Blue Ribbon has released a “Hard Coffee” in select markets. Where can you find it? What is it? What’s in it? Why did Four Loko get in trouble with the FDA for caffeinated alcohol but this drink is okay? Food Scientist GreenEyedGuide answers these questions in this review of PBR Hard Coffee.

Don’t have time to watch the full episode? You can read the highlights below.

PBR Hard Coffee: Ingredients, Safety, and Where to Find It – YouTube Episode

What is PBR Hard Coffee?

PBR Hard Coffee is not a blend of coffee and beer. It’s not a beer with coffee flavoring. According to the PBR website, it’s not even “beer”.

PBR Hard Coffee - "Not Beer" according to PBR website

PBR indicates this is not beer, it’s a flavored malt beverage.

What’s the difference between beer and a flavored malt beverage?

According to Charlie Bamforth, Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor of Brewing Science from the University of California, Davis:

Beer is an alcoholic beverage made from malted cereal grain, flavored with hops, and brewed by slow fermentation.

According to Beer and Brewing’s online dictionary:

A flavored malt beverage (FMB) is an alcoholic beverage made from original base containing malt, but then stripped of malt character and then flavored. … FMB production starts out much like a beer and then goes through treatment (carbon filtration, reverse osmosis, etc) to remove as much beer and malt flavor and color as possible. The clear, colorless treated malt base is then sweetened, usually with high-fructose corn syrup, and then flavored.

PBR Hard Coffee Ingredients

PBR Hard Coffee ingredients are arabica and robusta coffee beans, creamy milk, and sweet vanilla flavor.

PBR Hard Coffee Caffeine Content

A “standard” cup* of coffee contains 100 mg caffeine. According to CNN (the only ones who had this amount in their coverage), there’s 30 mg caffeine in a can of PBR Hard Coffee.

*NOTE*Please note 100 mg is used as the industry standard. However, it’s common knowledge the actual amount in a cup of coffee varies wildly – researchers even found variation when they bought a cup of coffee from one location on multiple days. [Reference] [GEG Summary]
caffeine amount in Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) Hard Coffee compared to Red Bull and a standard cup of coffee - GreenEyedGuide.com

A 12-oz can of Red Bull has 110 mg caffeine – just a little more than a “standard” cup of coffee. PBR Hard Coffee has 1/3 of that amount – containing only 30 mg caffeine per can. The caffeine mg-per-oz amounts of PBR Hard Coffee, a standard cup of coffee, and a 12-oz Red Bull are 3, 13, and 9 mg-per-oz, respectively.

PBR Hard Coffee Alcohol Content

The alcohol content of PBR Hard Coffee is comparible to other flavored malt beverages: Mike’s Hard Lemonade, Henry’s Hard Soda, Truly Sparking, and Smirnoff Ice all have about 4-5% alcohol-by-volume (ABV).

The alcohol content of PBR Hard Coffee is also comparable to a the original PBR can of beer.

Is PBR Hard Coffee safe?

How many cans of PBR Hard Coffee can you drink before it becomes dangerous? In an earlier episode on the GreenEyedGuide YouTube channel, I reviewed the consensus of several different countries regarding mixing caffeine and alcohol.

Screenshot of GreenEyedGuide YouTube Episode: Mixing Caffeine and Alcohol
You can watch this full episode by clicking here

The scientific consensus of the European Food Safety Authority is that you can have up to 200 mg caffeine mixed with enough alcohol to give you a Blood Alcohol Content of 0.08. If you exceed 200 mg caffeine or BAC 0.08, mixing caffeine and alcohol becomes no longer safe**.

*NOTE* For all the side-effects and risks of mixing caffeine and alcohol, see the YouTube Episode above – skip to time stamp 4:51.
Caffeine Informer graphic showing what 200 mg caffeine looks like - 2.5 Red Bull, 1.25 cans of Monster, 6 cans of Coca-Cola, 2.5 cups of coffee.
THIS GRAPHIC from CaffeineInformer.com shows how much caffeine you can safely mix with alcohol.

The graphic above, from Caffeine Informer, shows how much caffeine you can safely mix with alcohol – at 30 mg per can, the caffeine amount in PBR Hard Coffee is very low, so it makes PBR Hard Coffee much safer than something like the original (pre-2010) Four Loko.

Why did Four Loko get in trouble with the FDA but this PBR Hard Coffee is okay?

On the FDA’s information sheet on caffeinated alcoholic beverages, they clarify the reason the manufacturers of caffeinated alcoholic beverages got in trouble is they were adding caffeine to the products. According to the FDA, caffeine is an “unsafe food additive” because it is not approved, at any amount, to be added to alcohol. Adding a natural source of caffeine, however, is just fine.

If you’re curious about FDA regulations around caffeine, this blog post does a good job of explaining the regulations for caffeine in food, drinks, and supplements.

The difference with PBR Hard Coffee is there’s no added caffeine, they’re adding coffee, which is a natural source of caffeine. Hello, loophole? Maybe…

The amount of caffeine in PBR Hard Coffee is so low you’d have to finish 7 cans before the caffeine crosses that 200 mg threshold where it starts interfering with how drunk you feel.

Where can I find PBR Hard Coffee?

This drink is still being tested in select markets – Pabst wants to see how successful this drink is going to be before going all in.

Right now (as of July, 2019) you can only get PBR Hard Coffee in the following states:

  • Pennsylvania
  • Maine
  • New Jersey
  • Florida
  • Georgia

If you live in one of those states, you can use the store locator at this link to find the nearest location of where you can buy it.

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I’ve researched the science and safety behind energy drinks and their ingredients since 2003. This book is the culmination of my research:

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Energy Drink Bans

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How Much Caffeine Can I Have (and how do I remember that number)? Caffeine Science in 60 Seconds

March is Caffeine Awareness Month!

Here’s ONE thing you can do to be a better caffeine user. Behold: Caffeine Science in 60 Seconds- How Much Caffeine Can I Have…(and how do I remember that number)?

GreenEyedGuide (that’s me, your favorite energy drink scientist) has a silly mnemonic device to help you remember how much caffeine you can have in one day.

View this post on Instagram

Here's ☝️thing you can do to be a better caffeine user. Behold: Caffeine Science in 60 Seconds- How Much Caffeine Can I Have…(and how do I remember that number)? GreenEyedGuide (that's me, your favorite energy drink scientist) has a silly mnemonic device to help you remember how much caffeine you can have in one day. 🤗☕The Magic # is 400!☕🤗 400mg caffeine is the max healthy adults should consume in one day. This is the number several bodies (#pun) agree on including US FDA Health Canada and the European Food Safety Authority. Happy Caffeine Awareness Month!!! 🤓💚☕🔬 #caffeineawarenessmonth #sciencebehindenergydrinks #caffeinescience #energydrink #caffeine #foodscience

A post shared by Danielle Robertson Rath (@greeneyedguide) on

🤗☕The Magic Number is 400!☕🤗

Yes, 400 mg caffeine is the max healthy adults should consume in one day. This is the number which several bodies (pun) agree on, including US FDA, Health Canada, and the European Food Safety Authority.

You may have seen those web page errors: “404: File Not Found”. Well, the error associated with 400 (our caffeine limit magic number) is “Bad Request”. So remember this: to consume more than 400mg caffeine in one day would be a BAD REQUEST.

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Happy Caffeine Awareness Month!!!

🤓💚☕🔬 This post was originally published on Instagram – Follow GreenEyedGuide for the latest news/nerdy fun in energy drinks and caffeine science.

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Review the entire ENERGY DRINK OF THE MONTH SERIES

I’ve researched the science and safety behind energy drinks and their ingredients since 2003. This book is the culmination of my research:

Explore the CAFFEINE INFORMER database

Need help with quitting caffeine?

8 Facts for Caffeine Awareness Month [infographic]

March is Caffeine Awareness Month! To commemorate this occasion, I’ve assembled the information (all of it with reference citations) every caffeine consumer should know.

March is caffeine awareness month

This infographic was prepared by food scientist and biochemist Danielle Robertson Rath, founder of GreenEyedGuide.com and author of “Are You a Monster or a Rock Star: A Guide to Energy Drinks”. This infographic is possible thanks to the generous support of CaffeineInformer.com. Thanks also goes to Dr. Clay Jones.

REFERENCES:

 

GreenEyedGuide Caffeine Challenge Day 10/10 – 10 Tips for Label Reading

For the 10th and final day of the GreenEyedGuide Caffeine Challenge we review the 10 things on a label to check before consuming a caffeinated beverage or other health/functional beverage.

Thank you for playing along with the Caffeine Challenge! You can always share your favorite caffeinated beverages with me on Instagram/ Facebook/Twitter and tag @GreenEyedGuide.

Through this challenge, you’ll learn how to use the 5 Levels of Fatigue to reap the benefits of caffeine while avoiding addiction, dependence, tolerance, and toxicity.