Caffeinated Water 101

How does caffeinated water compare to energy drinks in terms of ingredients and safety? What does the latest research say about caffeine and hydration? As a food scientist who’s studied the science behind energy drinks since 2003, I believe caffeinated waters can be a great alternative to the stereotypical energy drink, but there’s a lot more to consider before deciding whether caffeinated waters are right for you.

CONTENTS:

  • Caffeinated Waters 101 – Safety, Science, and Preferences
  • Caffeine and Hydration – What does research tell us?
  • Caffeinated Water Spotlights

Read more

Do you need energy drinks in your 20s? [Guest Post]

The following is a guest post provided by Walter Hurley, who works as a freelance writer for https://eduzaurus.com/There are several good points here, and I am one of those people who would not have made it through college and grad school without the help of energy drinks. Balancing multiple jobs and rigorous studies in biochemistry, “get more sleep” was not an option. 

Why Drinking Energy Drinks Is Important in Your 20s

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Source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/drinks-supermarket-cans-beverage-3008/

When you’re in your 20s you have a lot on your plate, whether it is going through the rigors of college or graduate school, playing sports, raising a young family, or all of the above. With such high demands on your body, it is essential that you supplement your diet with natural products that increase your alertness and overall physical performance. One thing you might not have known is that consuming energy drinks can be a healthy, beneficial way to achieve these results for both men and women. Energy drinks tend to get a bad rap, but with the right knowledge, you will see that they really can make a positive difference. But don’t just take our word for it; the research is in and energy drinks are the way to go.

Essential Nutrients

The website Livestrong.com provides a review of four important ways in which energy drinks can act as a booster whether you’re in an office or at the gym.

  • CARBOHYDRATES. A typical 8-ounce can of energy drink contains between 18 and 25 grams of carbs [according to the National Federation of State High School Associations’ Sports Medicine Advisory Committee]. Carbs are important for replenishing your body’s energy levels and the result can include better performance and recovery.
  • CAFFEINE. Caffeine is a common ingredient in most energy drinks that is good at boosting performance. While caffeine content can vary from brand to brand, the top-selling energy drink contains 80 milligrams of caffeine [according to Caffeine Informer]. The recommended daily limit of caffeine consumption is 400 milligrams for healthy adults.
  • ELECTROLYTES. As your body sweats, you lose electrolytes. Electrolytes are nutrients that serve a variety of important functions such as regulating your heartbeat and allowing your muscles to contract. Electrolytes also help keep your body hydrated. For best results, seek out energy drinks with 460 to 690 milligrams of sodium per liter.
  • SIMPLE SUGARS. You are typically told to avoid simple sugars because of their negative side effects such as raising unhealthy blood sugar levels. However, when you are loading up on carbs before highly intensive athletic activities, simple sugars are key. Unlike complex sugars, the simple forms of sugar are devoid of fiber, which is good because, as you are exercising, fiber can cause digestive problems. The liquid form of simple sugars is an easy, instant way to gain the benefits, which is yet another reason why energy drinks can be beneficial.

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Source: https://pixabay.com/en/runner-track-athlete-relay-race-1544448/

Good for the Heart

The European Society of Cardiology found concrete evidence that consuming energy drinks can improve heart function. This study, which involved subjects with a mean age of 25, found that drinking energy drinks containing caffeine and taurine improved left and right ventricular functioning one hour following consumption. The amount of energy drink that each participant consumed was based on their body surface area, which amounted to 168 ml/m2. Taurine serves as one of the beneficial ingredients in energy drinks because it regulates the flow of calcium, which is necessary for a healthy heart.

Improves Physical and Mental Performance

A study published in the medical journal Amino Acids also discovered some good news involving energy drinks. In this particular case, Red Bull Energy Drink (which contains caffeine, taurine, and glucuronolactone – a naturally occurring chemical that contributes to the structure of connective tissues)  was measured against non-energy control drinks. The study found that subjects who drank Red Bull saw improvements both physically and mentally. The physical benefits were found after having the participants ride cycle ergometers: those who drank 500ml Red Bull saw increases in aerobic endurance (the ability to maintain a high heart rate) and anaerobic performance (maintaining maximum speeds). The indicators of higher levels of alertness included better reaction time, concentration and memory. This is not to say that Red Bull is the best energy drink, although its aforementioned key ingredients are common among other energy drinks.

Of course, there are many energy drinks that contain higher and lower amounts of caffeine, some that are sugar-free, and even caffeine-free energy drinks that contain ginseng, acai berry and other ingredients that can increase alertness and energy levels. Ultimately, which energy drink is the best for you comes down to your own lifestyle choices and what you seek to achieve in terms of physical and mental benefits.

Consume Energy Drinks in Moderation

Of course, the main thing to note is that just like everything in life, when consuming energy drinks, you would want to make sure to do it in moderation. It goes without saying that high levels of caffeine and sugar are bound to have negative health consequences, so always keep to the daily recommended levels as espoused by the medical experts and use energy drinks as part of an active lifestyle. So go out there and choose the best, healthy energy drink that is right for you!

This guest post is provided by Walter Hurley who works as a freelance writer for https://eduzaurus.com/.

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Learn how to find the best energy drink using the 5 Levels of Fatigue

Review the entire ENERGY DRINK OF THE MONTH SERIES

GreenEyedGuide Caffeine Challenge Day 1/10 – Fatigue and Dehydration

For Day 1 of the GreenEyedGuide Caffeine Challenge, we review water’s health benefits, facts about dehydration, and why Fatigue Level 1 = dehydration! In this Caffeine Challenge, you’ll learn how to use the 5 Levels of Fatigue to reap the benefits of caffeine while avoiding addiction, dependence, tolerance, and toxicity.

PLAY ALONG – post a picture of your water bottle or water tracker on Instagram and tag @GreenEyedGuide, or add your pictures to the Caffeine Challenge Event page at Facebook.com/GreenEyedGuide/events

Support GreenEyedGuide on Patreon at Patron.com/greeneyedguide

Love energy drinks/coffee/caffeine? Visit Facebook.com/energydrinkguide

Love Fitness + Caffeine = visit Facebook.com/greeneyedguide

Energy Drink of the Month – December 2016: Core Organic

How do you describe a beverage that is a hybrid of juice, water, and tea? This month we’ll review a beverage that aims to give you the health benefits of tea, the hydration of water, and the flavor of fruit juice. While the caffeine content is negligible, there is tea in it, and Fatigue Level 1 is dehydration! We’ll review WHO IT’S FOR (per diet/lifestyle and ingredient preferences), WHAT’S IN IT (key ingredients), and WHEN TO CONSUME IT (per caffeine content and the 5 Levels of Fatigue).

*Spoiler Alert* I’ve got three minor Food Scientist pet peeves with this beverage, and I would love to hear your thoughts on these observations.

The Energy Drink (alternative) of the Month is Core Organic Pomegranate Blue Acai.

Other flavors available include Peach Mango, Watermelon Lemonade, Orange Clementine, Coconut Colada, and Orchard Pear. If you’re familiar with my Energy Drink of the Month series, you know I almost always pick the pomegranate blueberry flavors.

WHO IT’S FOR

This Core Organic “fruit infused beverage” is certified Organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, low glycemic, and Vegan.

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  • PET PEEVE #1: Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.
    • Why would any of those be in a fruit-infused beverage? Does anyone else feel like Core Organic is trying to win consumers by tapping into that fad?

This beverage could appeal to you if:

  1. You are limiting your sugar intake and your “liquid calories” – This drink has less than 1 gram of sugar per serving and only 5 Calories per serving (10 Calories per bottle)
  2. You are avoiding artificial sweeteners – This drink is sweetened with Stevia and Organic erythritol (we’ll review this below)
  3. You are avoiding artificial colors and/or flavors – The color comes from Organic vegetable juice and fruit juice, and the flavor comes from a combination of natural flavors
  4. You are not really a tea drinker but still want the benefits of drinking tea – This drink has 75 milligrams of polyphenol antioxidants, which is “the antioxidants of half a cup of blueberries or cherries” according to the press release in BevNET

core-organic-pomegranate-blue-acai-ingredients

WHAT’S IN IT

Fruit Juice

  • PET PEEVE #2: This is a “fruit infused” beverage but the fruit juice doesn’t play a very big role. 

There’s only 4% juice per serving. The FDA does consider coconut water a juice, but since it’s behind erythritol in the ingredient’s list, we know there’s more erythritol than coconut water in this drink.

The Organic lemon juice is behind the Stevia extract, which is very telling! Since Stevia is something you can’t use in large amounts, there can’t be more than one lemon’s worth of lemon juice in here. Since the lemon juice comes before citric acid, it seems both the lemon juice and the citric acid are in this drink to control acidity. If you want to keep mold out of your fruit juices, you have to either control the acidity or use preservatives.

The last two fruit juices are the last two ingredients in the list, meaning they’re the smallest portions of the recipe. There’s fruit juice used for color, and Maqui berry juice powder used to deliver antioxidants.

5-in-1 weight loss supplement combo IS effective, but thanks to WHICH combo?

White Tea, Maqui Berry, and Polyphenol Antioxidants

The good news is consumption of polyphenol antioxidants is associated with improved cardiovascular health and reduced risk of cancer. Consumption of green and white tea is associated with lower risk of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The bad news is white tea is such a small portion of this recipe, and Maqui berry is literally the last/most sparse ingredient!

Maqui berry is a “Chilean blackberry”, according to a paper in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. It might have a lot of antioxidants in nature but one paper suggests the juice making process results in a “substantial loss” of the polyphenol antioxidants in Maqui. If you can figure out how to minimize these losses, there are some encouraging (but still uncertain) health benefits. A group of antioxidants called “anthocyanins” extracted from Maqui berry improved fasting blood sugar levels in (wait for it) obese diabetic mice.

“Animal research can be useful, and can predict effects also seen in humans. However, observed effects can also differ, so subsequent human trials are required before a particular effect can be said to be seen in humans. Tests on isolated cells can also produce different results to those in the body.” – see the Compound Interest infographic on Scientific Evidence

Erythritol

Erythritol is one of my favorite sweeteners, and we’ve talked about it before in other reviews. Erythritol makes Stevia better when they’re combined. Some people get a bitter-metallic sensation with Stevia extract, but erythritol masks the unfavorable attributes of Stevia. Erythritol is 60-70% as sweet as sucrose and has a very similar taste. It does not raise blood glucose levels and it delivers a cooling effect. While it’s non-caloric like Stevia, it has a molecular size that gives it more mouthfeel. Think fruit juice versus fruit smoothie: the fruit smoothie has a heavier “mouthfeel”.

Erythritol occurs naturally, like monk fruit and Stevia. It’s made through natural fermentation. It’s a sugar-alcohol, like the Xylitol often used in sugar-free gum. With xylitol, however, too much of it can really upset a person’s stomach. With erythritol, a person could consume twice as much – at least 0.66 grams per kilogram of body weight – before they started getting same stomach issues. Additionally, erythritol has been proven through clinical studies to reduce plaque build-up.

Core Organic beverage nutrition facts ingredients caffeine content
Caffeine content is “about the same as a cup of decaf coffee”, so does that mean 45mg? There is no standard for this!

WHEN TO CONSUME

  • PET PEEVE #3: There is no such thing as a standard cup of coffee or cup of tea.
    • It’s not clear how much caffeine is in this product, but we should assume the content is negligible. The white tea is the only source of caffeine, and white tea is not a very prominent ingredient.

Core Organic is not promoting itself as a drink that would give you energy, but since it includes white tea extract, I wish they could include some caffeine information on the label.

Dehydration is Fatigue Level 1, so picking a beverage with negligible caffeine content is a great way to ensure you don’t reach for the caffeine too soon. If you always reach for the same caffeinated beverage, and if caffeine is always your first solution when you’re tired, there will come a day when the caffeine no longer works for you. This is precisely why I developed the 5 Levels of Fatigue!

Bottom Line

This water/juice/tea hybrid is not marketed as an energy drink, but it’s a good solution (pun intended) for beating the fatigue that comes with dehydration. While you will not get the full benefits of drinking plain tea, you still get the benefits of the 75 milligrams of polyphenol antioxidants per serving.

Core Organic main site

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ENERGY DRINK OF THE MONTH YEAR IN REVIEW (YEAR 1 AND YEAR 2…year 3 coming soon…)

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