What’s wrong with this picture:

“Lawyers representing the deceased, Alex Morris, contend he consumed at least two 16-ounce cans of Monster’s energy drink within the 24 hours prior to his death. “…

Key Words: at leasttwo 16-ounce cans within the 24 hours… 
 
“Kevin Goldberg, one of the lawyers representing Morris, said in a statement. ‘We believe that it is important to get the word out to the public, and especially to parents of young people, that energy drinks can be lethal, particularly to anyone with an undiagnosed, underlying heart condition.’ ” 

Okay, how about we “get the word out to the public” that consuming 2 whole 16 ounce cans in less than 24 hours is dangerous. This tragedy is avoidable, but only if lawyers and doctors focus on the source of the problem – consumption practices.

Monster Energy Slapped With Another Wrongful Death Suit

Health Canada and the FDA use 400 milligrams per day as the maximum caffeine dosage determined safe, but that’s the dosage PER DAY, for HEALTHY adults. Children and adolescents should not consume half this much caffeine, and NO ONE should consume this much caffeine in less than 6 hours, which is the maximum length of time it takes half the caffeine dose to break down (the “half-life”).

One 16-ounce can of Monster Energy (the green one or “full-powered” one as I’d call it) contains 160 milligrams of caffeine. Monster Energy Caffeine Levels     Consuming two of those in less than 24 hours still puts one around the maximum daily dosage, but 320 milligrams of caffeine in less than 6 hours still puts a lot of stress on the heart.

It’s unclear whether the deceased had any preexisting condition but I’m afraid that if we keep putting the blame on the product and ignore consumption practices, these tragedies will keep happening.

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